177th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (1864 - 1865)

Updated: May 19, 2011

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

Infantry regiments formed in Ohio became known as regiments of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. On September 1, 1864, the 177th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry mustered into service at Cleveland, Ohio. The men in the regiment were to serve a one-year term of enlistment.

Upon mustering, authorities dispatched the 177th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry to Nashville, Tennessee. Travelling via Indianapolis, Indiana and Louisville, Kentucky, the regiment arrived at Nashville in October 1864, where it joined Major General George Thomas's Army of the Cumberland in the Military Division of the Mississippi and the Department of the Ohio. Officials immediately ordered the 177th's men to Tullahoma, Tennessee. While at Tullahoma, the regiment saw limited combat.

In late 1864, Northern forces evacuated Tullahoma. On December 2, the 177th Regiment relocated to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, where it helped to defend the town during Confederate General John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee’s siege of the community. The 177th participated in numerous skirmishes during the siege, including the Battle of Wilkerson’s Pike, where the regiment captured two twelve-pound Napoleon cannons and two hundred Confederate prisoners, while having only five or six of its own men wounded. The 177th remained at Murfreesboro during the Battle of Nashville.

Following the Union victory at the Battle of Nashville, officials ordered the 177th Regiment to join the 23rd Army Corps. The regiment advanced to Clifton, Tennessee, where it remained until mid January 1865. At this time, officials dispatched the 23rd Army Corps, including the 177th regiment to North Carolina. The regiment travelled to Cincinnati, Ohio via riverboats and then by train to Washington, DC and Annapolis, Maryland. The 177th then boarded ships, arriving at Fort Fisher in North Carolina on February 7, 1865.

Upon arriving in North Carolina, the 177th participated in two skirmishes along the Cape Fear River. In a flanking maneuver, Union forces, including the 177th Regiment, forced Confederates to evacuate Fort Anderson. The 177th also fought in the Battle of Twin Creek, where Northern soldiers captured the entire Confederate force. The 177th then advanced upon Wilmington, North Carolina, capturing the city. After one week at Wilmington, the 177th advanced to Kingston, North Carolina and then to Goldsboro, North Carolina, where the regiment joined Major General William T. Sherman’s army. Following the surrender of Confederate General Joseph Johnston’s army, officials assigned the 177th Ohio to garrison duty at Goldsboro. The regiment remained at Goldsboro until June 24, 1865, when officials sent the regiment to Cleveland for discharge from military service. The 177th formally left the service on July 7, 1865.

During its time of service, the 177th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry had two men killed on the battlefield. The regiment lost eighty-two soldiers to disease or accidents.

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"177th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry," Ohio Civil War Central, 2019, Ohio Civil War Central. 23 May 2019 <http://www.www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=487&>

APA Style

"177th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry." (2019) In Ohio Civil War Central, Retrieved May 23, 2019, from Ohio Civil War Central: http://www.www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=487&

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